Fancy STANDARDS OF PERFECTION
Introduction

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Self

Early in the development of this fascinating hybrid, florists began to specify the qualities of the perfect plant even to defining the proportions of the parts of an individual flower (usually called a pip). These parts or zones of an edged auricula pip from the outside working inward are called the edge(coloured green, grey or white), ground(usually black or very dark red), paste(pure white) and tube(of a rich golden colour).

MADDOCK   1792

6:3:1
GLENNY   1832

4:2:1
HUDSON   1794

3.5:2:1
The definition of the ideal auricula is therefore just made for the application of mathematical systems of proportion. Proportions are traditionally specified in terms of the sizes of the diameter of the pip, the centre or paste and the tube relative that of the tube. The ground, always in practice at odds with the smooth regular geometry desired by florists, is typically specified as extending to about half the portion of the pip outside the paste.

A long time has past since Maddock, Hudson and Glenny defined their standards for the perfect auricula. Unfortunately they did not explain why these standards were chosen. Who knows how the old florists would have defined their ideal auricula given the benefits our current knowledge and technology? Would they have tried to improve the standards of perfection or rest on thier laurels?

In an attempt to explore the aesthetics (both beauty and perception) of this intriguing plant and to increase our understanding of what really constitutes perfection some thoughts are given an airing. The aim is not to discredit the status quo but to determine the principles on which the standards are based and apply these rules to further the development of our favourite flower.
Standards of Perfection based on Continuous Proportions.
"Rigidly Defined Areas of Uncertainty"

Evaluate various Standards of Perfection by Counting Proportions.

Standards of Perfection using Euclidean Distances.
"The Plot Thickens"

Photographs of auriculas can be found in the Auricula Gallery.

Ideal Truss

Gardener's Chronicle
c.1845
COMING SOON

"Mirror mirror on the wall
What is the fairest flower of all?"

"The impossible takes a little bit longer."

Alpine
Reference:-
David Tarver "Auricula History",
National Auricula and Primula Society (Midland and West Section)
Society Guides No. 5 , 14-16

NAPS M&W SHOWS AURICULAS PRIMULAS HUMOUR